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The supplement business is a multi-billion dollar industry that is not currently regulated like conventional food and drug products by the Food and Drug Administration. The use of supplements is designed to add further nutritional value to the diet, not to act as a meal replacement. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration and caption/ Airman 1st Class Daniel Brosam) Research dietary supplements before use
Supplements often fall into a gray area, as they are neither vitamins nor drugs, and Airmen can easily be tricked into buying what they think will help them with weight gain or loss. With lack of research and improper use, consumers may face negative results, such as high blood pressure, dehydration and increased heart rate.
0 6/21
2017
Col. Jeremy L. Thiel, 319th Air Base Wing vice commander, visited the Bounce workshop offered at the Youth Center on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. March 17, 2017 to congratulate the children on completing the 2-day class. The Bounce workshop teaches children and teenagers what resiliency is, and how to apply it to their lives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elora McCutcheon) New teen bounce workshop
The atmosphere of a classroom in the Grand Forks Air Force Base youth center was buzzing with energy and excitement March 16 and 17, 2017 from a group of children participating in the new two-day Teen Bounce workshop.
0 4/04
2017
Senior Airman Cody Willingham, 319th Civil Engineer Squadron engineering journeyman, gets ready for work Nov. 21, 2016, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. Willingham begins his day at 6 a.m. and goes to a second job at the end of his duty day to help offset the cost of the degree his wife is pursuing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Sparks) Education: There is no better time than now
Senior Airman Cody Willingham, 319th Civil Engineer Squadron engineering journeyman, and his family understand the value of a good education.
0 11/23
2016
Default Air Force Logo 319th MDG offers tips to combat head lice
Each year there are between six and 12 million cases of head lice among children between the ages of three and 11 that occur in the United States. With kids now back in school, it is important for parents to be aware of this potential issue.
0 11/22
2016
Senior Airman Robert Bales, 319th Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintenance journeyman, inspects an Oshkosh 26’ Snow Plow Oct. 13, 2016, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. The harsh winter conditions of North Dakota require constant maintenance on the 319th LRS vehicle fleet. (U.S Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Sparks/Released) 262-car garage: LRS prepares for winter
The 319th LRS vehicle management flight consists of 37 Airmen, 24 active-duty Air Force members and 13 civilians. Those Airmen are responsible for maintaining 262 vehicles valued at more than $30 million during the harsh winters of North Dakota, as well as the rest of the year.
0 10/14
2016
319th Force Support Squadron Honor Guardsmen exercise as a unit on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. Sept. 28. “It is a team effort, everyone is pushing every single person in the Honor Guard unit or even if we have people join our workouts, we are always going to push everyone to finish,” said Senior Airman Charles Farber, 319th FSS Honor Guard Flight Leader. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijaih Tiggs) Sharp physical training for sharp Airmen
The 319th Force Support Squadron honor guard upholds the responsibility of staying fit and mission ready by committing to five physical training sessions a week at minimum, even when traveling for ceremonies and events.
0 10/03
2016
Area Defense Counsel Capt. M. Dedra Campbell and Defense Paralegal Staff Sgt. Natesha Champion represent the Area Defense Counsel on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. Sept. 28. The ADC operates under a separate chain of command which allows the ADC to provide confidential legal advice without command influence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijaih Tiggs) Area Defense Counsel offers legal support
Airmen are held to a higher standard than their civilian counterparts. In the event Airmen fall short of that standard, they are met with consequences of adverse military actions. The manner in which one responds to those actions could either rebuild their Air Force career or set them on a path towards discharge. The Area Defense Counsel assist
0 9/28
2016
Master Sgt. Stephen Middleton, 319th Security Forces Squadron first sergeant, is attacked by Zumba, 319th SFS military working dog, as Senior Airman Katelyn Farmer, 319th SFS MWD handler, stands by to give her K-9 the next command, Aug. 10, 2016, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. Middleton has been assigned to the 319th SFS for more than a year as a first sergeant. He is showing his appreciation to his defenders by performing different aspects of their career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Xavier Navarro/Released) Defender appreciation through the eyes of a First Sergeant
A first sergeants’ role is to serve as the senior enlisted adviser to their unit commander. First sergeants take care of their Airmen and guide disciplinary actions when needed. The first sergeant of the 319th Security Forces Squadron is showing his appreciation to his defenders by performing different aspects of their career field.Master Sgt.
0 8/18
2016
Default Air Force Logo Avoid West Nile Virus with simple precautions
With the sun shining and the birds chirping, summer is finally in full swing. This means an increase in time spent outdoors for you and your loved ones. However, summer also means a drastic rise in the mosquito population. While most people simply consider mosquitos a nuisance, it is important to remember that they can also carry and spread
0 7/22
2016
Tech. Sgt. Timothy Davis, 319th Air Base Wing ground safety technician, sits at his desk on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D., May 24, 2016. Davis recently received his second Community College of the Air Force degree in safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Bonnie Grantham/Released) Degrees of growth
A key to progress in both a career and in life is to accept change and grow with it, whether in or outside the military.A few Airmen here recently spoke about what change means to them and how it's helped them in their careers, as well as their personal lives.Tech. Sgt. Chelsea Roberts, 319th Force Support Squadron Airman Leadership School
0 5/24
2016
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