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Pest management sprays the base

A C-130 Hercules assigned to Youngstown Air Reserve Station, Ohio, flies above Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, June 12, 2018. While the C-130 is capable of operating in remote locations around the world, this particular mission focused on controlling the number of mosquitos through the use of an aerial spray. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

A C-130 Hercules assigned to Youngstown Air Reserve Station, Ohio, flies above Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, June 12, 2018. While the C-130 is capable of operating in remote locations around the world, this particular mission focused on controlling the number of mosquitos through the use of an aerial spray. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

A C-130 Hercules releases a mosquito control pesticide across Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, on June 12, 2018. This particular mosquito pesticide spray targets the mosquito larvae on base before they become flying adults. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

A C-130 Hercules releases a mosquito control pesticide across Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, on June 12, 2018. This particular mosquito pesticide spray targets the mosquito larvae on base before they become flying adults. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

Senior Airman Patrick Archer and Airman 1st Class Jonathon Simmons, both 319th Civil Engineer Squadron pet management journeymen, observe a water sample June 13, 2018, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. The pest management section collects samples of water often to observe and monitor mosquito larvae populations and determine the best course of action. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

Senior Airman Patrick Archer and Airman 1st Class Jonathon Simmons, both 319th Civil Engineer Squadron pet management journeymen, observe a water sample June 13, 2018, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. The pest management section collects samples of water often to observe and monitor mosquito larvae populations and determine the best course of action. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

A mosquito aerial sprayer, or fogger, is used June 13, 2018, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. The 319th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management section conducts fogging operations in areas on base where mosquitos are the most active. The optimal weather conditions for spraying is when there is no rain, or overcast, and the wing speed is under 10 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

A mosquito aerial sprayer, or fogger, is used June 13, 2018, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. The 319th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management section conducts fogging operations in areas on base where mosquitos are the most active. The optimal weather conditions for spraying is when there is no rain, or overcast, and the wing speed is under 10 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

Senior Airman Patrick Archer, a 319th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management journeyman, conducts an aerial spray demonstration June 18, 2018, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Archer advised to use hand soap and water as an alternative to bug spray. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

Senior Airman Patrick Archer, a 319th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management journeyman, conducts an aerial spray demonstration June 18, 2018, on Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Archer advised to use hand soap and water as an alternative to bug spray. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Melody Wolff)

GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. --