Warrior of the Week: Senior Airman Sean Egan

Senior Airman Sean Egan, 319th Security Forces Squadron alarm monitor, logs on to the computer to monitor live surveillance footage to detect any suspicious activity on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D., April 24, 2015. Egan was selected as the Warrior of the Week for the last week in April. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bonnie Grantham/Released)

Senior Airman Sean Egan, 319th Security Forces Squadron alarm monitor, logs on to the computer to monitor live surveillance footage to detect any suspicious activity on Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D., April 24, 2015. Egan was selected as the Warrior of the Week for the last week in April. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bonnie Grantham/Released)

GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. --

Name: Senior Airman Sean Egan

Unit: 319th Security Forces Squadron

Duty title: Alarm Monitor

Time in service: 2 years and 6 months

Time on station: 2 years

Hometown: Cleveland, Ohio

Why is serving in the Air Force important to you?
The Air Force is like a second family, a home away from home. When you take away someone's name on their uniform, all they have left is "U.S. Air Force."  You [serve] for the people to the left and right of you to make sure they get home safely at the end of the day.

What moment or accomplishment as a Warrior of the North are you most proud of and why?
The Phoenix Raven program I attended. I'm raven number 2310; so, since 1997 when the course started, I'm the 2,310th person to go through it and get certified. Being a cop is a small microscope to be placed under but being a Raven magnifies it. You always have to be on your toes and be ready for anything.

What is your favorite part of your job?
My favorite part of my job is communicating and interacting with people on a day-to-day basis. People think cops are out to get them, but that's not true. We're there to help people when they need it.

How do you apply the wing commander's principles of 'passion, proficiency and professionalism'?
To me, passion is a big one. They always say, "If you love what you do, you'll never work a day in your life"; I don't feel like I work because I want to be a cop and I love being a cop. I have to be proficient at what I do to ensure everything goes smoothly. I can't only be good at certain things because if I'm responding to something that I'm not good at, then I'm going to struggle. That's why I always have to train and be squared away. I always have to be professional because I'm always encountering different ranks of people in the military. I want to make sure not to abuse my authority as a cop and remember there's a tactful way of going about things, which is always the professional way.

Who or what inspires you and why?
My family is a big inspiration. They're all hard working. They always remind me that one side says "Air Force" but the other side says the family name. If it's not the Air Force by it, then it's my family name by it, so I'm going to give it 100 percent of my capability to the best of my abilities.

What's the first thing that made you think Grand Forks Air Force Base was a cool place other than the temperature or weather?
Last year when I was able to hold a boxing event to raise money for the base, it let me know the leadership here really does take the time to listen to Airmen and accommodate Airmen's ideas. It showed me that no matter what your rank is, you're not too small to make a change. You can always get out there and accomplish goals in life.